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Our Building

Location

Latrobe City has generously assisted Centenary House by acquiring a two hectare site on Valley Drive, Traralgon, on the Northern Boundary of the Latrobe Regional Hospital. This is being leased to Gippsland Rotary Centenary House for 25 years at a peppercorn rental.

This site is within easy walking distance of the hospital and the Gippsland Cancer Care Centre. It offers Centenary House both convenience for guests and is large enough for a landscaped garden setting and future expansion.

Building – stage 1

Centenary House is a single story facility. The design by architect Audun Pedersen, was based on experience from Ronald McDonald House, Clayton.

Stage 1 comprised:

  • Five large units with two single beds, ensuite bathroom, kitchenettes and seating area.
  • One units with two single beds, ensuite bathroom and seating area.
  • Two self-contained units separate bedroom, disabled access bathroom and lounge / kitchen with cooking and eating facilities.
  • Communal kitchen with two workstations.
  • Communal dining area
  • Communal lounge
  • Communal laundry with washing machines and dryers
  • Secure children’s playground and recreation room adjacent to lounge.
  • Reception and administration office.
  • Tranquil courtyard with seating and water feature.
  • Reading area
  • Computer area with internet access
  • Quiet Room’ for family privacy and counselling.
  • Off-street parking
  • Closed circuit TV security system for after hour’s access.

The children’s playground and outdoor living/BBQ area are secure and have limited access.

Cost

Stage 1 cost approximately $2.5 million and was funded by the following sources:

  • $500,000 – State Government
  • $400,000 – Federal Government
  • $400,000 – Latrobe City
  • $432,000 – Philanthropic Trusts
  • $300,000 – Rotary
  • $250,000 – Public Donations
  • $250,000 – Donations In Kind

Construction

Construction work on the main building was completed by Lemchems and Skulke Pty Ltd of Maffra in 2006.
Businesses within Gippsland provided building materials and services at or below cost to be built into the new building.

Community members and Rotarians have also been giving their time freely to this project.
Central Gippsland TAFE Horticultural College carried out the landscaping design and preparation through a Community Partnership and Rotary District 9820 donated plants for the surrounds.

Building – Stage 2

The design was again completed by architect Audun Pedersen and included a number of improvements developed from the experience with stage 1.

Stage 2 comprised:

  • Nine large units with two single beds, ensuite bathroom, kitchenettes and seating area.
  • Communal kitchen, dining and lounge area.
  • Courtyard with BBQ and seating.
  • Communal laundry with washing machines and dryers
  • All access bathroom
  • Sunroom
  • Community room with meeting facilities and kitchenette
  • Two offices.

Cost

Stage 2 cost approximately $2.4 million and was funded by the following sources:

  • $1,500,000 – Federal Government
  • $50,000 – State Government
  • $80,000 – Philanthropic Trusts
  • $670,000 – Funds on hand (previous donations)

Construction

Construction work on the main building was completed by Kingbuilt Commercial of Moe in 2011.
Landscaping was completed by Brother Nature subcontracting to the major builder.

Gippsland Path

A fundraising project initiated by the ACE radio group offered donors recognition through and engraved paver to be placed in a map of Gippsland on the site. With the early awareness that expansion was required this concept was altered as the space needed for stage 2 eliminated the area available for the paved map. The new plan included a walking path that mapped out the different areas of Gippsland and provided access to the hospital.

BBQ Gazebo

The community BBQ gazebo was initiated by Margaret McDonald, wife of Rotary International District Governor Ken McDonald who raised the funds to build the facility.

The gazebo was constructed by the GippsTAFE pre-apprentice students as a project for assessment during their course. Donations in Kind were provided by many companies and they are acknowledged with a plaque in the gazebo. Other work was carried out by volunteers from local Rotary Clubs and the community.